Hillary Clinton's Vision for the Future of Health Care

The New England Journal of Medicine recently published Presidential Nominee Hilary Clinton's response to the question, " What specific changes in policy do you support to improve access to care, improve quality of care, and control health care costs for our nation?"

According to Journal editors, Trump did not respond to the question at all.

Read what Hilary had to say about the future of Health Care --->

National Cancer Survivors Day 2016 - Communities to Celebrate Cancer Survivors, Raise Awareness on June 5

On Sunday, June 5, 2016, cancer survivors and supporters in communities around the world will gather to celebrate the 29th annual National Cancer Survivors Day® and raise awareness of the issues of cancer survivorship.

There are nearly 14.5 million people living with and beyond cancer in the U.S. today, and more than 32 million cancer survivors worldwide. On Sunday, June 5, 2016, communities around the world will gather to recognize these cancer survivors as part of the 29th annual National Cancer Survivors Day®.

National Cancer Survivors Day® is an annual worldwide Celebration of Life that is held on the first Sunday in June. It is the one day each year that people around the world come together to recognize the cancer survivors in their community, to raise awareness of the challenges these survivors face, and, most importantly, to celebrate life.

According to the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, administrator for the celebration, “A ‘survivor’ is anyone living with a history of cancer – from the moment of diagnosis through the remainder of life.”

“When most people hear the word ‘cancer,’ they automatically think the worst,” says Foundation spokesperson, Laura Shipp. “But the truth is that more people are living longer and better quality lives after cancer than ever before. National Cancer Survivors Day® is an opportunity for these cancer survivors – and those who support them – to come together and celebrate this new reality in cancer survivorship.

“But this is also a day where we want to bring attention to the hardships cancer survivors still face. These include not just physical side effects but also psychological, social, and emotional distress, as well as significant financial hardships. Our Foundation hopes that NCSD serves as a call to action for further research, more resources, and increased public awareness to improve quality of life for cancer survivors.” 

Everyone knows someone who’s life has been touched by cancer. The National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation is encouraging all citizens to participate in their community’s event. To locate the one nearest you, check with your local cancer treatment center, hospital, or American Cancer Society office. Or you can host an event of your own using the resources available through the National Cancer Survivors Day® website, ncsd.org.

The nonprofit National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation provides free guidance, education, and networking resources and assistance to hundreds of hospitals, support groups, and other cancer-related organizations that host official National Cancer Survivors Day® events in their communities. The Foundation’s primary mission is to bring awareness to the issues of cancer survivorship in order to better the quality of life for cancer survivors.

As the number of cancer survivors continues to grow, it is becoming ever more important to address the unique needs of these survivors. Many face limited access to healthcare specialists, a lack of information about promising new treatments, inadequate or no insurance, difficulty finding employment, and psychosocial struggles. Once active treatment ends, cancer survivors still must cope with the long-term effects of cancer, which can include ongoing physical side effects as well as potentially devastating financial setbacks.

The National Cancer Survivors Day® Foundation, along with NCSD 2016 national sponsors and Amgen, Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Coping with Cancer magazine, is encouraging a greater commitment to lessening the burden of cancer survivorship.

“Cancer survivors are now living much longer after diagnosis thanks to advances in modern medicine. And the strides researchers are making in cancer treatment are amazing to see,” says Shipp. “However, we need to do a better job of addressing the hardships cancer survivors face beyond treatment.”

Leading up to National Cancer Survivors Day®, the NCSD Foundation urges everyone to spread the message that there is life after cancer – and that’s something to celebrate – but we can still do more to lessen the burdens of cancer survivorship. The following are suggested posts for your social media sites:

On Facebook: There is life after cancer – it is beautiful, it is meaningful, and it is something to celebrate – but we can still do more to lessen the burden of cancer survivorship. Join us as we #CelebrateLife and raise awareness on National Cancer Survivors Day, June 5. #NCSD2016

On Twitter: We can do more to lessen the burden of cancer. #CelebrateLife, raise awareness on National Cancer Survivors Day, June 5. #NCSD2016

National Cancer Survivors Day® 2016 is sponsored nationally by Amgen, Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Coping with Cancer magazine, with support from Genentech, Raquel Welch® Signature Wig Collection, and Teva Oncology.

About the Foundation

The nonprofit National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation (ncsd.org) provides free guidance, education, and support to hundreds of hospitals, support groups, and other cancer-related organizations that host National Cancer Survivors Day® events in their communities. The Foundation’s primary mission is to bring awareness to the issues of cancer survivorship in order to better the quality of life for cancer survivors.

About National Cancer Survivors Day®

National Cancer Survivors Day® is an annual, treasured Celebration of Life that is held in hundreds of communities nationwide, and around the world, on the first Sunday in June. It is a CELEBRATION for those who have survived, an INSPIRATION for those recently diagnosed, a gathering of SUPPORT for families, and an OUTREACH to the community. On National Cancer Survivors Day®, thousands gather across the globe to honor cancer survivors and to show the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be fruitful, rewarding, and even inspiring.

It is a day for everyone, whether you're a cancer survivor, a family member, friend, or medical professional. This day provides an opportunity for all people living with a history of cancer – including America’s 14.5 million cancer survivors – to connect with each other, celebrate milestones, and recognize those who have supported them along the way. It is also a day to draw attention to the ongoing challenges of cancer survivorship in order to promote more resources, research, and survivor-friendly legislation to improve cancer survivors’ quality of life.

Closing the Mortality Rate Gap for Minorities

An encouraging study has been released which shows the gap is narrowing in cancer related mortality rates between African-Americans and Caucasians for certain kinds of cancer like prostrate, lung, and colorectal cancer in women.

The report analyzes cancer statistics starting in the 1990s up through 2012, and both a clinician and consumer version has been released. Unfortunately, the racial disparity has actually widened for breast cancer in women which may be related to inequalities in access to care, including screening and treatment, so there is still more work to be done.

Please read more about the report via this link.

 

A Diet High in Fiber Found to Reduce Chance of Breast Cancer

We all know we should eat healthier.. for our weight, for our heart, for our blood pressure and so on, but diet is proving to have a huge impact on our chances of developing cancer as well.

A recent study conducted over several years among 44,000 women found that those who consumed a diet high in fiber during their high school years were 24% less likely to develop breast cancer.

Studies had already shown fiber helps reduce risk for colorectal cancer... but breast cancer? Theories as to why range from improving insulin sensitivity to a reduction in circulating estrogen levels.

But it does seem to be especially important to eat well during the teenage years to gain the full benefits of a high fiber diet and reduce the risk of developing cancer. 'Maryam Farvid, a fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health who is lead author of the study, says the influence of fiber on cancer risk may be time-sensitive. Adolescence is "a period when breast cancer risk factors appear to be particularly important," she says.'

Read the full article on NPR.org.

USA Today: Cancer Mortality Rates Higher Among the Impoverished

USA Today released an article confirming what we have known for a long time- access to care and something as simple as a cancer screening is much harder for those in lower income brackets. And late detection of cancer results in higher mortality rates among those groups:

“We really can alter survival from the disease with early detection,” says Andrew Salner, director of the Hartford HealthCare Cancer Institute in Connecticut, one of several New England states that fared well. “We can bring down mortality … if we can provide equal access to care.”

But getting preventive screenings and quality treatment is much tougher for people who struggle daily just to get by. So cancer preys upon the poor. State-by-state rankings for poverty closely mirror those for cancer deaths.

Surviving financially day-to-day often takes priority over a doctor's visit or symptoms that can be ignored until it is too late.

“When you’re living in poverty, you have more immediate problems than seeing about getting a prostate screening or, ‘Is it time for a colonoscopy?’ ” he says. “You’re trying to make sure food is on the table. You’re trying to make sure the lights are on.  So we neglect our health a lot of times.”

What good are ground-breaking cancer treatments and early detection screening technologies if they never reach the people who need them most?

Read the full article on USA TODAY.

FDA Holding Public Meeting on FSMA Preventive Controls for Human and Animal Food Final Rules

Announcement by the Food and Drug Administration

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today a public meeting to offer the opportunity for discussion on the recently finalized rules on preventive controls for human and animal foods under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

The meeting, entitled “FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: Final Rules to Establish Requirements for Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk – Based Preventive Controls for Human and Animal Food,”  will be held on October 20, 2015 from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. at Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, 540 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611.

The public meeting will also provide an opportunity to discuss the FDA’s comprehensive planning effort for the next phase of FSMA implementation, which involves putting in place the new public health prevention measures and the risk-based industry accountability framework that is at the core of the act.

Public meeting attendees are encouraged to register online to attend the meeting in person or via live Webcast.  For questions about registering for the meeting or to register by phone, contact Courtney Treece at 704-258-4983, FAX: 469-854-6992, e-mail: ctreece@planningprofessionals.com. Early registration is strongly recommended because seating is limited.

For general questions about the meeting or to request special accommodations due to a disability: Juanita Yates, FDA, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, 240-402-1731, e-mail: Juanita.yates@fda.hhs.gov.

Registration and Additional Information

Please note the following important dates:

  • October 6, 2015: Closing date to request special accommodation due to a Disability
  • October 12, 2015: Closing date for Advance Registration

University of Maryland Constructing Groundbreaking Proton Treatment Facility

Not many may know of a fairly new cancer treatment approach known as Proton Therapy. Unlike other cancer treatment options, proton (or particle) therapy targets just the cancer tissue, minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue.

The University of Maryland is 1 of 4 institutions building APT cancer treatment centers. Once the facility opens, it will employ over 170 medical professionals trained in proton therapy. To read more about this exciting addition to Baltimore's growing cancer care survivorship network, visit www.advancedparticletherapy.com.